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Goal Song Poll = Cheap Marketing Ploy

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By Brad Lee

Go to the Blues' Web site and see what they've done with with the results of the "fan poll" where they asked if the team should change the song played inside the DrinkScotch Center after the Blues score a goal. Along with a video that launches automatically, they hit you up with this:

More than 8,000 fans responded to our poll and voted to keep our traditional goal song, 'The Blues Go Marchin In'. Every time the Blues score, 'The Blues Go Marchin In' will rock the Scottrade Center.

Seats in the Scottrade Center are filling up quickly, so get your tickets today. Call 622-BLUEÂ to learn about our full and partial season ticket plans. Thank you for voting, and LETS GO BLUES!

Did anyone vote for the "new" song? And we're confused. Were there 8,000 total votes or did the votes for the traditional song total 8,000? Also, this thing has poor punctuation not evident on the rest of the Blues' Web site, also a good clue that this was put together by the sales department and not the editorial side of the Blues organization.

You see what they did here? As we wrote before, this thing was just a gimmick to perpetuate the idea that this regime is more plugged into the fans and wants to cater to what the ticket-buying public wants. The team knew hardly anyone would vote for that horrendous new song. They knew they could get people to vote and come back to the site to see how the poll turned out. And then they took that opportunity to trumpet how they listen to the little guy...and then offer to sell you some season tickets.

For the record, we don't begrudge the team trying to sell more tickets. A crowded arena is better for the team, game atmosphere and for underground fan-run publications sold outside. We also think this ownership group and team management are building a team the right way and are better connected to the fan base. We get it. We just want the Blues to stop insulting our intelligence with half-baked PR schemes.

Speaking of half-baked ideas